What I learnt from Beirut in between my relocation: (drops mic..)

As you may recall, last year I travelled back to Canada in order to get a feel of the country that was going to adopt me a second time round.  After three months of stress-free bliss and peace of mind, I went back to Beirut, determined and eager to pack my bags and move out. Little did I know that i’ll be stuck another ten months before setting foot in Toronto again.

Beirut, the city that everyone is in awe with. The city at which expats reminisce their good old days.

Beirut, the city everyone longs to visit for the wrong reasons and any Lebanese living abroad thinks would come to the glorious state they left it behind.

Beirut, the city that turned open minded adults into bigots and sank most of them to their lowest level in order to survive among the majority of the liars & cheats.

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Who runs Lebanon? The liar, the cheater, the whore & the money launderer.

Who succeeds in Lebanon? The hypocrite, the mistress and the corrupt.

Who suffers from the above mentioned? The law abiding citizen & the one who fears God only.

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I faced all the above mentioned entities my entire adult life in Lebanon, however within the bracket-ed ten months in & out Lebanon, I felt a level of frustration towards society itself that compelled me to share it with you all. Hell, I am NOT going to be seeing any of you soon (nor ever, even when i’ll be obliged to come for a visit) top to that, the whole society that is slowly sinking itself to its own expiration, I wish you hit rock bottom quickly.

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Ten months in Lebanon made me realize how much people changed. Maybe it’s the fact that I was surrounded by genuine people and a helping community back in Toronto, that its lack in Beirut shocked me even further.

Let me develop my point in this order:

About the prospect of work >> Do you know how many times I heard people wanting to genuinely help me ground myself in Beirut by promising me introductory meetings with X & Y for a job, a freelance project? And I will leave you guessing at how many of those people followed up on their promises. If I wanted to re-enter the corporate world I would have done it easily. I have the qualifications and I know the right people within that sector.  But setting foot in the tight knit world of blogosphere? Thankfully, I soon realized that I did not want to be part of a virtually pathetic hypocritical circle whatsoever when I can write and voice my thoughts far away from the influencers and their blind minions. I am more than happy to interact with people that relate to my content and me as a person. You don’t like what I am saying just now? Please go and Instagram caption your whiny remarks. I just love seeing people adopt two different personalities, one for the real world and one for the virtual one, different from each other as black & white. The virtual world in Lebanon? A pathetic scene in which every influencer badmouths the other yet comments lovey dovey remarks under each others picture.  Alas this world is attracting the next generation of 13 year olds (I do not want to imagine the future of such society..).

Let’s proceed.

How about liberal workers >> Lawyers, doctors and contract workers have stooped to a despicable level. You want to reach an agreement with one or close a deal with the other, then you will need to lie and make promises up to your teeth to reach a quarter of your (legal) demands and come out a sore (loser) winner. And then everyone wonders why court dates take decades to be resolved and infrastructural projects years to finish. Where are the workers that used to put their conscience first and ahead of their selfish gains? None existent. Dead. Literally.

Now my favorite >> Friends. Let’s just say that I no longer trust anyone I felt at some point in time close to and friendly with. You see, some people might think that because I am quiet I do not realize that I am being conned out of something and/or into something (depending on the situation). But I do realize the unfairness of being used out of my kindness. And I shut up. Why? Because I am better than that; that being fighting in settling a fair friendship with anyone that is not worth my time and kindness. Anymore.

No wait this is my favorite >> your ex want to become a part of that life of yours. Haha! Now that’s a funny turn of events. After being broken up for 5-7 years, the ex return with force trying to sweep you off your feet. Seriously? I am going to give up my future in a decent powerful country to stay in Lebanon and end up marrying you for all the wrong reasons that I can think of? I am not even going to answer that…. 

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Seriously, look around you, who is happy and living la Dolce Vita in Lebanon?

The lying and conniving businessmen (mind you, we have no clue what import/export or business consultant implies here…) and his possy

The dolled up thirty year old who is the proud owner of the latest Range Rover and condo in the downtown area (Mmmm..)

The proud mama smiling and obliging to everyone at face value yet bickering at those same persons behind their backs

The peoples’ pet  who trot their behind everywhere trying to please just anyone so as to be included in some sort of superficial circle and claim they made it (doing what? I think they themselves never figured that one out)

Those who put themselves first and the rest (every single person they know) later

and every single fearless Godless cheat in the city.

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How about us law-abiding respectful citizens of Lebanon?

We are scattered worldwide making a life for ourselves in a country that respects its citizens and a society that embraces and puts one another at a pedestal we would have never imagined coming from our closest friends back home. 

We have crossed out Lebanon from our mind and heart, its corruption, its people and the jungle way of doing things because being successful without crossing a dark passage leads 3/4 of the time to failure.

We succeed without our last name, our family ties and monetary influences. And most importantly we succeed and are recognized for our own merit not bedroom escapades.

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You can raise hell and object to every single thing I mentioned above, but deep inside you know that I am right. What I just wrote is thought by almost everyone, except you, living in La la land, I mean Lebanon.

Tough Luck with that!

Cya

ps: my deepest and outmost respect to the couple of people still believing in their Lebanon and striving against all odds to make it through bad and badder. Respect to you and keep on writing and voicing yourself (for your countrymen).

Open mindedness & disrespect; women draw that line.

Disclaimer: In no way this post is intended to a specific person. So if you feel targeted, take a chill pill sweetheart and ask yourself, why you do feel I’m addressing you? Thank you! 

In Lebanon, every woman considers herself from the highly esteemed ‘haute société’ however forgets to behave as such in society. We have said it many times, ‘l’habit ne fait pas le moine’ (the cloths do not make the man) but alas such expression reaches the deaf ears of Miss Louboutin, Mrs GuccixRandomLebaneseFashionDesigner and the lot of them.

However I am not here to judge your cloths, they are gorgeous, but your attitude? Nay Nay/ Abort. Who am I to judge? Well I am a very concerned citizen (and yes I come from a highly respected family-the real deal B), a woman who is alarmed by the high rise of disrespectful, vulgar and ugly women inside and out elevating in social circles and being given credit and respected for doing nothing at all. Well technically, not nothing at all, #BlessedForSugarDaddy’s helping wallet in accessing the right circles…

On the other hand, let’s forget the aesthetic and focus on personality.

I personally believe that any form of (well brought up/good family *hint hint) personality overshadows materialistic cloth. I will give you credit. Ok. Fine. However, surprise surprise. I wish I left you at Prada and never let you open your mouth. Looks like being liberal and open minded has led you to another complete stratosphere.

I have come to notice that, as of late, women are being tacky and petty in the name of ‘being liberals and open minded’. I have nothing against these two features, however etiquette should be brought into the equation. A well brought up woman (so she says whenever she wants to address her family roots in public) should not turn into a loud mouth babbler whenever she wants to make a public statement. Ranting is good. Being moderate is even better. However ranting on anything and everything is just not making a point. It is being a vulgar psycho socially. Take a chill pill babe.

For crying out loud, what happened to women being poise in society? What happened to brilliant minds? All I see is them being overshadowed by loud mouths? What happened to tackling a problem or making a point in a polite way? Diplomacy anyone?

What happened to Lebanese women raising the standard high? Yes there are very successful women out there. And yes many of them come from neat background, however shouldn’t we start giving credit and elevating these successful minds up the bar instead of those trolls parading on and offline?

Again I am not against the concept of being liberal and open minded, however I am for tact and a woman behaving like one.

Draw that line. Please.

xo

 

From Bentley to Uber; an upgrade!

I was 18 years old when I started taking driving lessons with my father’s driver. I was not to keen to learn ‘manual’ and opted for the easy ‘automatic’ because like most Lebanese drivers I wanted to buy my license. However to clear my conscious (and that of the driver/teacher) we decided that I would get my license only after he didn’t feel threaten for his life on our daily lesson. And the day came and I graduated from “Anto’s Driving Academy” with flying honors and started cruising in the city in my mom’s car (to the rather arched eyes of hers).

Flash forward 13 years, after three car change and a promise of a Bentley Continental GT as my wedding gift, I made the drastic decision of selling my car as I was moving out of the country for good. For someone who has, all her life, been used to being chauffeured around and driven herself from a place to another, the mere thought of being car-less brought a panic attack onto my pampered ass.

Abroad we are all use public transportation whereas in Beirut we do not acknowledge them, which is understandable when looking at those filthy buses roaming the roads of the capital. Thankfully, the ‘service’ has upgraded itself from the famous 1980s Mercedes. But then again, we think twice before riding one (rather I do).

I learnt a lot from letting go of my comfort (place/toy/zone) and here is what I have come to realize:

We are way too attached to material things. We think that we will not be able to survive without them in our life. That they are what keep us going everyday. Slight wake up call guys! We can do without them and there are alternatives to ease us around (Uber? Private cab?).

We only acknowledge BMW, Audi and Mercedes in this country. These cars bring status. As a previous owner of one of this brand, I admit that was my sole reason behind owning one, although the gift came unexpectedly one spring day 6 years ago. I realize now that this is so over rated given the number of people who can afford one if their credit history permits them through the bank. + you cannot buy class through material things (thats a proven fact. Look around you!).

The country’s infrastructure is not too well developed to be parading with the latest model of any given high end car. I know too well how many times I had to change a tire because a nail had ruptured it. It is only these past couple of years that I came to realize how much money is thrown on unnecessary luxury when we can all do well without (what if you owned a Honda?). Here it is wise to mention that with each passing year, the price of your car depreciates. My 51K straight from the dealership merely brought me back 13K. Talk about fairness (and another panic attack).

Too much traffic. Yes. Too much due to unnecessary cars on the roads. Carpooling anyone? Or has that concept not reached the shores of Lebanon? I guess it hasn’t yet.

Now that I am back for a couple of months I am happy that I do not own a car. Why? well for the simple fact that I got my sanity back from this stressful sport. I gotten used to being driven around in Canada, (hey!!) subway station everyone. Buses too. More importantly I walk walk and walk. Just a few days ago, I walked under the rain to get to my appointment. 40min walk daily > what better way to keep your blood flowing. And I realized once again how shallow and Lebanesey I was by driving from X to Y instead of just walking the 15min trajectory (and instead of drowning in traffic for 30+min). If those reports of 500K tourists visiting Lebanon in a few weeks true, I wish you luck my fellow people.

Btw did I tell you how addicted I have become to Uber? Yeah that too.

Good Week to you all 😉

 

What they omit telling you about Lebanon.

They love to brag about everything that is cliche about the country; the beach, the snow, the different sects living within, the rooftop parties, and blablabla…. but most importantly they omit to describe to you the truth.

The truth that every Lebanese knows about his 10452m2 heaven on earth but dare not say and sometimes shuns away from.

Bullet pointed below are few of these points based on reality fact checks:

  • First of all, and most importantly for anyone coming from abroad, the country stinks. Yes it stinks. If you do not believe me, please do travel for a few months, come back and tell me what hits you first thing you set foot outside the airport. A lousy stench. That’s what slaps your nostrils in the face.
  • Second of all, we all agree that Lebanon is no longer the Switzerland of the Middle East. Neither, can we be all high and mighty by thinking that we are better than the UAE. We are not. We are by far, worse than any of the Arab countries we so love to look down on. Take a mere example of how they abide by their rules (ex:transportation/road system/labor) and societal norms, while we live like pigs by disrespecting the law every chance we get or bending the rules to suit our livelihood and further trashing our already (literally) trashed country by throwing tissue out of our car.
  • The social rules and regulation set aside, this country is not only polluted, its citizen lacks hygiene. By the latter, I mean you cannot walk down the street without stumbling on dog poop. You just cannot have an enjoyable walk because you are too busy staring at the ground. To all dog owners out there who do not clean up behind their four legged furs I have one thing to say: I hope you slide and fall on dog poop next time you are out with ‘Vanilla’ / ‘Vodka’ (yes, because c’est pas cool de donner un nom commun a son chien-chien ).
  • Men are pig? Yeah maybe.. but Arab men are far worse. There is an alarming frustration /sexual tension among men from this part of the world. I think all women living in Lebanon will agree with me that one cannot go out in public wearing as she pleases without being harassed. Before you jump down my throat, I am not talking to the fashionistas who wear their mini shorts and parade from one place to another in their cars hence cannot be subjected to such degrading behavior. I am talking about women who prefer to walk their way around like me and although wearing your basic jeans and t-shirt or knee length shorts are subjected to ogling eyes and orgasmic interjections from men (young/old alike). Do not tell me you haven’t witnessed slow moving cars and the generosity of drivers letting you cross the street while their eyes focusing on your Bs (boobs & butts ladies!).
  • I think one thing that I have not, till this day, understood, is the popularity of the New Range. Range Rover, New Range, whatever the name and model, I think you visualized the car. Lebanese love this car. No wait. They worship this car. This mean of transportation equals status, class and wealth. Oh how I would love to slap some sense into this visual cliche. This car might be worth 150,000$ when bought the latest year of production, full option and brought from the nest (Europe), however I have seen so many buying them second (if not third) hand from car dealerships and on installment (end price say 25,000$) just so they can parade on the ill-made roads of the city. Still acting like a snob because of your vehicle? Well think again, my mechanic (with all due respect) has just bought his NR and I am pretty sure he is not as wealthy as he wants to show / be. Your car is so overrated!
  • Open minded? Free? No we are not open minded. Nor are we free. We like to show that we are. Thank God we are not oppressed like the citizens of the KSA. But we are not open minded nor are we free to act as we please. If its not the stone age laws that sets us back, it is the social norm/ mentality that does.

I don’t know about you but a caricatural image of a sort has formed in my mind when re-reading this post. I am not trying to mock the country. I am simply stating facts and the truth of every day real life in Middle Eastern Lebanon.

Tell me you haven’t felt, witnessed and thought about the above mentioned points.

Be honest.

xo

 

Lebanese Series; graduates from the same acting school?

Don’t look at me like that!

I have never been fond of Lebanese series/ movies. The only time I watched a series was while visiting my grandmother every night for two months in a row before she moved out of Lebanon. I was astonished by the quality of the series I was following; the story was appealing and intriguing, the main character young and very stylish. It was a love story full of suspense and similar to none (not that I have watched any series before – hearsay per se).

Flash forward a couple of months and it was my turn to move out and settle with my grandma. You all know how it is difficult to up-root old people whereas us, young adults, navigate and settle easier. One day I decided to give my grandma an enjoyable evening by searching for a Lebanese series. Hence started an internet- based series marathon. While she was enjoying the story and the characters, I was taking notes.

Lebanese series reflect Lebanese society realistically and truthfully, I can assure you that. The stories depict entangling relationships of the heart, the alarming schism between the rich and the poor. The latter’s struggle whereas the former’s shocking lifestyle.

The following are the points that I have gathered after watching three full Lebanese series:

1- The preferred mean of transportation is non other than the ‘New Range’ (surprise surprise ya jagal!!)

2- “Ana Kteer jou3an, khalina netlob sushi” (of course, sushi satisfies everyone’s hunger!)

3- Let’s zoom on those Louboutin and the H Hermes belt. How ridiculous is that Lebanese society’s nouveau rich (or spoilt adults)know how to flaunt their status through these two items only!!

4- Rise of french terminologies (Oui mon cher?)

5- Looks like the series cannot live without the help either (Rosita coffee please!).

6- Lebanese women we know you have been voted many times “most beautiful women in the world” (although in my opinion, it’s your make-up artist that should have bene given some sort of award) but seriously waking up in fully untouched face paint, really?

7- Secondary cast gives a feel of reading the script, not acting it. Especially those played as nurses, waiters. Emotion= zero. Robotic babble= 10).

8- Within two of the series that I have watched, the principle male character is a chauvinist patriarchal being and his love interest has no problem abiding by his decisions. I don’t know about you, but young female adults nowadays have reached their independence and I am sure that they would never allow some macho so-called charismatic man treat them that way. Just stop showing women weak with love!!

9- The disparity between the poor and the rich is phenomenal. Yes truly, you either are rich or you are poor. The in between live off credit only for show-off purposes.

10- Have you ever encountered a married couple not giving a kiss on the lip to one other? I have! in every Lebanese series ever.

The series that I have watched recently, back to back, are rich and poor at the same time. Rich in content/plot yet poor in acting. I don’t know about you, but actors seem to have graduated from the same acting school and I believe that they have a long way for their acting to become natural on screen. Sometimes I feel that they would be better off acting in the theater than behind a recorder. You know, theatrics and all.

One word of advice, when scenes of fight are to be rolled, please do keep the camcorder straight instead of giving us a headache and an epileptic seizure. Teach the cast how to throw a fist instead of giving the audience a spasm by rolling the camera left to right and up and down in a fit.

Thank you !

 

 

 

 

Why I am done with Lebanon for good.

Disclaimer: This post is my ever frank opinion of what I have left behind in Lebanon. An honest direct post I did not intend to write in a politically correct tone, for once. 

It is no secret that I am not fond of Lebanon. No wait let me start again. It is no secret that I hate Lebanon and everything that is related to its population and way of life. Ever since we moved back to Beirut in 1993 (from Montreal) my relationship with this Middle eastern country went from hectic to down right estrangement. Earlier this year, I decided that it was high time to leave everything and everyone behind and move back to my adoptive country. A very tough decision, tough not because I am going to leave everyone behind (those who know me know that I don’t give a flying fuck about anyone) tough because it is a huge irrevocable step once you set foot abroad, as I have a few days ago.

For the 23 years I lived in Beirut, rare are the memories that I cherish and hang on to. Why did it take me 23 years to take my decision to go back to Canada? personal matters. Now that I am settling back, I want to share with you few of the points that I am sure many of you relate to and that led me move back and enjoy North America very much these last couple of days. The points that I am about to share are more related to a human level than any of the usual rants people direct towards politics.

1- It’s mind blowing how every single Lebanese thinks he/she is God sent on earth. I have never seen a snobbish society as a whole. Its as if every single person became amnesic all of a sudden and woke up with a silver spoon in his/her mouth (in his/her mid twenties+). We tend to notice clones of women at any given event, at the mall (yeah plastic surgeons have all graduated from the same medical establishment abroad) yet at a closer look, we realize that their personalities is much worse defective than their face. Have you ever seen a Lebanese smiling at one another? Even in front of their cameras their (siliconed) lips are pouting and their faces ever so bored and high mighty. To be honest, I so many times wanted to bitch slap (verbally) snobbish friends back to their village, reminding them of their farming ancestors every time they tended to act superior when in public. I mean, fuck you bitch, if it weren’t for your dad slaving away in Saudi Arabia, and sending you a monthly salary (age 30+) you wouldn’t have dreamt eating at newly opened fine dining restaurants and mocking/yelling out orders to the staff and rolling your eyes at a passerby. And let’s not start with the employee with a 1000$ salary (tops) behaving as if she made 3000$+ parading & glowing with her signature outfit & attitude.

2- Let’s shift to the employment sector. It is simple, if you don’t have a “wasta” (its funny how that word auto-corrects itself to ‘waste’ whenever I type it) you are a nobody and you will never achieve your potential in Lebanon. And if you are under valued, all you need to do is master the open split and you will get to places. Higher places. Yes why are you looking at me like this? I have always said that among the people that easily succeed in Lebanon is the whore. The Lebanese whore is the all of a sudden successful female thrown in society and very much respected by her peers (for her position..). Men wanna fuck her (which she will hand fully pick depending on her future ambition) and women wanna befriend her (for the new alliances and doors she will be opening to them). The worse part of all this scenario is that the ambition and status of this woman is shallow and irrelevant to the big picture which is life. Many of these people find solace in social media with thousands of fake followers to give them the much needed boost to their fragile self confidence and ugly stature and personality. You wanna know what is pitiful for employees with wasta? Some mothers go to the extreme of whoring themselves or make big donations so as to ensure their children’s future at X and Y organizations. (true story).

3-Friends? What friends? this terminology is over-rated. Alliances yes. Friendship no. Over the years, I realized that I was surrounded by shallow hypocrites who secretly awaited my downfall in work as well as my relationship status. Hence the drastic cut of my ‘friends’ list. From one day to the other, best friends became strangers. I look around me and rare are the relationships that I define as friendship among the people that I know. Everyone is in constant competition with one another. Gatherings are occurred so as to fill social media pages with (fake) fun and a bubbly way of life. Of course, everyone is a hedonist whether they can afford the lifestyle or not (thank you Lebanese banks for the loans). Conversations are superficial and revolve solely around the fashion designers to be, the events that were launched, the dresses that were worn and the ‘celebrities’ that are popping like chicken pox. If you do not relate to this ever growing shallow society, then you tend to find yourself the odd one out and castrated. I do not tend to make an effort to anything that does not interest me nor would be an added value to my life. And by being that person, I, thankfully, realized who is the real friend that stood by me and I continued to genuinely enjoy his/her presence in my everyday life. Those that lingered away so as to establish themselves within this fake surrounding (knowingly aware of my adamant stand against) granted me the gift of discovering the meaning of true friendship. Here I take a moment to thank Meena, Angie and Rony for being the best friends one can ever wish for. The rest of you can go fuck yourselves.

4- The clash between life abroad and in Lebanon, I discovered when I went to pursue my studies in London. There I met genuine, caring and interesting people. People from around the world, from different culture and upbringing that further assured me of one important thing; my non-belongingness to the Middle East. Men respect their women when out and about. They are cultured and interested by you and not only your boobs and loubs. They are fine gentlemen. The women have intellectual discussions and gatherings revolve in open spaces, museums, walking, canoeing and taking pictures in which one can witness the big smile on their faces. Dates are respected and not cancelled at the last moment, or worse dismissed without any advance notice. To those who continue giving a self important image of themselves by not notifying a cancellation in appointment, I do not wanna say anything to them; their pitiful stand is more than enough.

Unfortunately, Lebanon proved to me a haven for the hypocrite, the fake, the whore, the loser and the self proclaimed celebrity.

In Lebanon, I did not find myself. I only found jealousy mastered at a professional level. I only found myself being judged and labelled. I found myself in professional situations where my family name played a role leading me in handing  my resignation letter. The honest hard working person is not appreciated. The liar and the whore is King/Queen.

I am thankful that as a Canadian citizen I am going to be able to fulfill my dreams with my own potential and certificates at hand. I am thankful that Canada is far away from the Middle East. And I am thankful that I have my family and best friends next to me forever no matter the distance.

xo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lebanese fellowmen: You do not deserve a night at the Museum!

Disclaimer: I had to take an hour to cool down before writing this post. However, what I am about to write does not give justice to the disgust and rage I still feel about my night at the “La Nuit des Musees” 2016. 

As an artist and a graduate of Art, I have developed a passion towards history of art and the contemporary art movements from WWI to nowadays. I have had the privilege to study art museums, galleries and curating abroad and visited many museums in the British capital and Europe.

Lebanon offers a lot when it comes to its art & culture, alas the general population is unaware of its rich heritage within its museums and galleries. I understand people have better things to chase and worry about than contemplate pieces of art from centuries ago.

“La Nuit des Musees” 2016 is an opportunity for everyone to visit specific museums and galleries for free one night only. And that night was today, April the 8th.

I started my tour at 5 sharp. I did not know what to expect but I was very eager to be part of it all. To my surprise, there were a lot of people queuing to enter museums and the shuttle  were filled with people eager to go to their next destination. I was happy to see a lot of parents with their curious children in tow. When abroad, its a normal scenery to see children interested in art, however I wasn’t expecting the same in Lebanon. I was positively surprised and happy.

That state of mind dropped when I entered the National Museum. I am sure you are aware that National Museums worldwide hold very unique historical pieces that should not be touched (like any pieces of art exhibited anywhere). I am sure as well that you know that especially cordoned off pieces should be looked at from a distance. However, to my utter shock (is it shock really? was I expecting this deep down?) the citizens of this beloved country have no clue of these rules. You do not need to be a rocket scientist to know the meaning of a cordoned off perimeter around a historical tomb. Nor do you need to be educated to restrain your child from poring his fingers in a miniature coliseum piece.

Two major scenes I witnessed turned my stomach inside out and made me head to the exit:

  • A mother and father along their 4 year old daughter were looking around till they laid eyes on the throne of Astarte from the Hellenistic period, (picture this; a mini throne). Not only did they not lay eyes on the cordon surrounding the piece below their feet, but they placed their child on the throne for a picture. I was in shock!!! We had to rush to inform the guide as there were no security guys around. By the way I did not see any of the latter. Maybe they were outnumbered by the pouring of people but they should have known that from previous experiences. The same family went on and on taking pictures and touching pieces. I mean if you uneducated people need to take a picture to prove you’re participating in the event, why don’t you go and photoshop yourself in like wise sceneries from the internet!! (an act very common within some…).
  • A dad was holding his son up high to give him the opportunity to pet a tomb and goofily froze to smile at the camera held by his wife. I don’t know what they were expecting; a genie to pop from the (bottle, scratch that) tomb???

Children were running everywhere unsupervised. Guides were hand full with people but doing a good damn job explaining each piece to their avid listeners. No security guards to be seen to contain the crowd.

As a passionate art lover I am happy to see Lebanese being educated to art. I encourage children to be exposed to art & culture. However after what I witnessed tonight, I think I can safely resume to my previous opinion of the Lebanese society; an ungrateful uneducated crowd that do not know the value of the heritage they have been left with nor a sense of appreciation to what they are being subjected to. If you need to take your child for the sake of a family outing (for free) then I do advise you to go to a park or at the corniche seaside and linger as long as you want.

I on the other hand will go back to enjoy some art sight seeing during the weekday peacefully and surrounded by like wise appreciative people.

……………